Common Core Drives Families to Classical Education

2013-State-House-Visit

Students from Oaks Academy with Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

Russ Pulliam of The Indianapolis Star wrote a fantastic article last Thursday that I wanted to point your attention to.

An excerpt:

Critics on the right object to the federal government dictating standards to the states. Critics on the left see Common Core as a business-driven plot to force conformity on students.

In Central Indiana a flight from the Common Core is driving some families to the even higher challenges of classical education.

Classical programs are growing their numbers, but they are not for everyone. Latin starts in the early elementary grades. Students read the classics, often above traditional grade level expectations. They memorize classical documents such as the Declaration of Independence or the Magna Carta. They learn states and capitals. They memorize multiplication tables and drill hard in math.

Note the classical school enrollment gains. Oaks Academy has gone from 390 to 402 students at its Fall Creek campus, and 85 to 162 at the newer Brookside campus. The Highlands Latin School in Carmel has jumped from 100 to 150 students, in just its third year. Classical Conversations, a one-day a week program for home school families, grew from 605 to 715 students across the state this fall. A smaller Roman Catholic school, Lumen Christi, grew from 85 to 93 student this fall.

Not all families who embrace the classical model are trying to avoid Common Core. But Common Core seems to represent an experimental, risky approach for families who want a longer track record.

Be sure to read the rest.

Photo credit: Oaks Academy

Originally posted at FightCommonCore.com

New Jersey Has Common Core Legislation

newjerseyflagNew Jersey State Senator Jeff Van Drew (D-District 1) introduced S2973 on 9/12/13.  This bill would establish a Common Core State Standards evaluation task force and it would delay the use of PARCC assessments until the task force submits its final report.  There is identical legislation in the New Jersey Assembly (A4403) introduced by State Assemblymen Bob Andrzejczak (D-District 1) and Nelson Albano (D-District 1).

Here is the text of the Senate bill:

SYNOPSIS

     Establishes Common Core State Standards Evaluation Task Force; delays use of assessments developed by Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers until task force submits final report.

CURRENT VERSION OF TEXT

     As introduced.

AN ACT establishing a task force to evaluate the implementation of the common core state standards.

BE IT ENACTED by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:

     1.    a.  There is established the Common Core State Standards Evaluation Task Force.  The purpose of the task force shall be to study the implementation of the common core state standards.

     b.    The task force shall consist of the following 19 members:

     (1)   the Commissioner of Education, or the commissioner’s designee, who shall serve ex officio;

     (2)   eight members appointed by the Governor, one upon the recommendation of the American Federation of Teachers New Jersey, one upon the recommendation of the New Jersey Association of School Administrators, one upon the recommendation of the New Jersey Education Association, one upon the recommendation of the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, one upon the recommendation of the New Jersey School Boards Association, one representative of a nonpublic school located in New Jersey, and two public members who are the parents or guardians of a student enrolled in a New Jersey public school;

     (3)   two members of the Senate, who shall not be from the same political party, appointed by the President of the Senate;

     (4)   two members of the General Assembly, who shall not be from the same political party, appointed by the Speaker of the General Assembly;

     (5)   one member, appointed by the President of the Senate, who has demonstrated expertise in language arts literacy instruction and curriculum;

     (6)   one member, appointed by the Speaker of the General Assembly, who has demonstrated expertise in language arts literacy instruction and curriculum;

     (7)   one member, appointed by the President of the Senate, who has demonstrated expertise in mathematics instruction and curriculum;

     (8)   one member, appointed by the Speaker of the General Assembly, who has demonstrated expertise in mathematics instruction and curriculum;

     (9)   one member, appointed by the President of the Senate, who is the parent or guardian of a student enrolled in a New Jersey public school; and

     (10) one member, appointed by the Speaker of the General Assembly, who is the parent or guardian of a student enrolled in a New Jersey public school.

     c.    Appointments to the task force shall be made within 30 days of the effective date of this act.  Vacancies in the membership of the task force shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointments were made.  Members of the task force shall serve without compensation, but shall be reimbursed for necessary expenditures incurred in the performance of their duties as members of the task force within the limits of funds appropriated or otherwise made available to the task force for its purposes.

     2.    The task force shall organize as soon as practicable following the appointment of its members, but no later than 60 days after the appointment of the members.  The task force shall choose one member of the Senate and one member of the General Assembly to serve as co-chairpersons.  The task force shall also appoint a secretary who need not be a member of the task force.

     3.    The Department of Education shall provide such stenographical, clerical, and other assistance, and such professional staff as the task force requires to carry out its work.  The task force shall also be entitled to call to its assistance and avail itself of the services of the employees of any State, county, or municipal department, board, bureau, commission, or agency as it may require and as may be available for its purposes.

     4.    a.  The task force shall evaluate the implementation of the common core state standards.  The evaluation shall include, but need not be limited to, the following:

     (1)   a description of actions taken by the State to date to implement the common core state standards and a timeline of any subsequent actions to be taken;

     (2)   a comparison of the common core state standards for English language arts and mathematics to the core curriculum content standards in language arts literacy and mathematics that existed prior to the adoption of the common core state standards;

     (3)   an estimate of the full cost for school districts to implement the common core state standards, including those costs already incurred by districts and those to be incurred in the future; and

     (4)   an analysis of students’ performance on the State assessments prior to the 2012-2013 school year and in the 2012-2013 and subsequent school years.  The analysis shall assess changes in the achievement gap between different racial and ethnic groups and different economic groups.

     b.    The task force shall also study and evaluate the issue of student and family personal data mining and a student’s right to privacy.  The task force shall consider, but not be limited to, data related to learning disabilities, student behavior, political affiliation, religious affiliation, and medical history.

     5.    The task force shall issue a final report to the Governor, and to the Legislature pursuant to section 2 of P.L.1991, c.164 (C.52:14-19.1), no later than six months after
the task force organizes.  Prior to issuing its final report, the task force shall hold at least four public hearings, with at least one public hearing to occur in each of the northern, central, and southern regions of the State, to gather information regarding the implementation of the common core state standards, the mining of student and family data, and student privacy rights.

     6.    The Department of Education shall not administer any assessment developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or any similar assessment, prior to the issuance of the final report by the task force pursuant to section 5 of this act.

     7.    This act shall take effect immediately.

STATEMENT

     In June of 2010, the State Board of Education adopted the common core state standards (CCSS) to replace the core curriculum content standards in language arts literacy and mathematics.  This bill establishes the Common Core State Standards Evaluation Task Force to evaluate the implementation of the CCSS.  The task force would include 19 members as follows: the Commissioner of Education or a designee; eight members, appointed by the Governor, five upon the recommendations of the American Federation of Teachers New Jersey, the New Jersey Association of School Administrators, the New Jersey Education Association, the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, and the New Jersey School Boards Association, one member who is a representative of a nonpublic school, and two public members who are the parents or guardians of a student enrolled in a New Jersey public school; two members of the Senate, appointed by President of the Senate; two members of the General Assembly, appointed by the Speaker of the General Assembly; two individuals, one each appointed by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the General Assembly, who have expertise in language arts literacy instruction and curriculum; two individuals, one each appointed by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the General Assembly, who have expertise in mathematics instruction and curriculum; and two public members, one each appointed by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the General Assembly, who are the parents or guardians of students enrolled in a New Jersey public school.

     The task force’s evaluation of the common core state standards would include: 1) a description of actions taken by the State to date to implement the new standards and a timeline for additional actions to be taken; 2) a comparison of the common core state standards to the academic standards that they replaced; 3) an estimate of the of full cost for school districts to implement the common core state standards, including those already incurred and those to be incurred in the future; and 4) an analysis of student performance on the State assessments before and after the adoption of the common core state standards.  The task force is also directed to study and evaluate the issue of student and family personal data mining and a student’s right to privacy.

     The task force is to issue its final report no later six months after it organizes.  Prior to issuing its final report, the task force is to conduct at least four public hearings to gather information.

     The bill stipulates the Department of Education will not administer assessments developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) until after the final report of the task force has been submitted.  The department currently intends to administer the PARCC assessments beginning in the 2014-2015 school year.

Complaint Against Science Standards Filed in Federal Court

NGSS-Logo

(Topeka, KS) On September 26 Citizens for Objective Public Education, Inc. (COPE) filed suit in federal court against the Kansas State Board of Education and the Kansas State Department of Education to enjoin implementation of science standards designed for all students in the US.

The Complaint was filed in Topeka, Kansas, in the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas.  Other plaintiffs in the suit include eight families with children enrolled in Kansas public schools and a family that represents Kansas taxpayers.

The Complaint and additional information may be found on COPE’s website: www.COPEinc.org.

The Complaint alleges that the Kansas Board’s adoption on June 11, 2013, of A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards (the F&S) “will have the effect of causing Kansas public schools to establish and endorse a non-theistic religious worldview” in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

In May and June, 2013, COPE urged the Kansas Board to reject the Standards for the reasons set forth in its analyses dated June 1, 2012 and January 29, 2013.  However, the Board and the Department of Education declined to discuss or investigate the concerns expressed in the analyses.

The Complaint claims that the Standards lead students to ask “ultimate religious questions” like “where do we come from?”  Rather than objectively inform children about these questions in an age-appropriate manner, the F&S lead them “to answer the questions with only materialistic/atheistic answers.”

This indoctrination is driven by the use of a concealed Orthodoxy (or doctrine) called methodological naturalism orscientific materialism.  The Orthodoxy requires that explanations of the cause and nature of natural phenomena may only use natural, material or mechanistic causes, and must assume that teleological or design conceptions of nature are invalid.

John H. Calvert, counsel for the plaintiffs, stated that “this case is actually about a concealed Orthodoxy that requires all explanations provided by science to be materialistic/atheistic. It is particularly problematic in the area of origins science which addresses ultimate religious questions, like: Where do we come from?  Public education about origins science needs to adequately and objectively inform age appropriate audiences about the use of the Orthodoxy and the relevant information and data it suppresses.”  Origins science is a historical science that studies the origin and nature of the universe, life, and the diversity of life.

The Orthodoxy is not religiously neutral as it permits only materialistic/atheistic answers to ultimate religious questions.  The concealed use of the Orthodoxy in the F&S has the effect of promoting the core tenets of non-theistic religions like Atheism and Religious (secular) Humanism.

The Complaint describes other mechanisms and strategies used by the F&S to establish the materialistic/atheistic worldview.  These include systematic omissions and misrepresentations, teaching the materialistic/atheistic ideas to primary school children whose minds are susceptible to blindly accepting them as true, programs designed to cause the views to become habits of mind, and the implicit exclusion of theists from provisions that require education to promote “equity,” diversity and non-discrimination.

The Complaint asks the court to enjoin the implementation of the F&S or, in the alternative, to enjoin the provisions of the Standards that deal with the teaching of origins in grades K through 8 and in grades 9 through 12 unless measures are taken to teach the subject objectively so that the effect of the instruction is religiously neutral.

The case against the Kansas Board is relevant to all other states in the U.S.  The other states that have recently adopted the Standards must now consider whether they should proceed with the expense of implementing a constitutionally suspect program.  The same issue will confront other states that may be considering their adoption.

Inquiries about the complaint should be directed to Legal Counsel as follows:

John Calvert, Esq., 816-797-2869

Kevin Snider, Esq., Chief Counsel, Pacific Justice Institute, 916-857-6900

Douglas Patterson, Esq. 913-663-1300

Citizens for Objective Public Education is a not-for-profit Corporation.  Its mission is to educate the public about the religious rights of parents, students, and taxpayers in public education.  It seeks to do this by promoting objectivity in public school curricula that address religious questions in a manner that will produce a religiously neutral effect.

Michigan House Passes Common Core Implementation with Local Opt-Out

michigan-flagHere we see the problem inherent with a full-time legislature.  The Michigan House and Senate passed an omnibus bill that defunded the implementation of the Common Core State Standards.  Since the Legislature continues to be in session year-round; Common Core advocates yesterday were able to pass a resolution before the fiscal year started in October that allows the implementation.

It passed 85-21. Courtesy of Stop Common Core in Michigan, here are the Representatives who voted no: Bumstead, Callton, Cotter, Daley Farrington Forlini, Franz, Genetski, Goike, Hooker, Howrylak, Johnson, Kurtz, Lauwers, Leonard, Pettalia, Potvin, MacMaster, McMillin, Rendon, and Somerville.

Be sure to thank them.  Take note if your Representative was not on the list.

The bill is a mixed bag however, there are some bright spots as it comes with conditions:

  • It allows local school districts to opt-out – so this battle can be fought at the local level.
  • It says that Michigan must be able to add or remove standards as it sees fit.
  • The standards can not dictate curriculum, and local districts must be able to maintain control over curriculum, textbooks, education materials and instructional methods.
  • It requires the Michigan Department of Education and Michigan State Board of Education to issue a report to the Legislature by December 1 that includes a review of all available student assessment tools, information about how they would be used, and how much they would cost to implement.  So there is a possibility Michigan could pull out of Smarter Balanced.

So take this battle local and encourage your legislators to dump Smarter Balanced.  Also, while it will probably be an uphill battle – contact your state senator.

Take Back Our Schools Conferences in Missouri

TBOS1The Missouri Coalition Against Common Core in conjunction with Americans for Prosperity Missouri announced three conferences they are holding in different areas of Missouri on the Common Core State Standards and Student Data Collection.  Each event will have national Common Core experts (I will be speaking in Kansas City).

Here are the dates:

  • Kansas City – Saturday October 5, 2013  at the North Kansas City Community Center (1p –6p)
  • St. Louis – Sunday October 20, 2013  at the Wildwood Hotel (1p – 6p)
  • Springfield – Saturday October 26, 2013 at the University Plaza Hotel (9a –2p)

Topics covered:

  • The History of Common Core Standards – How Did We Get Here?
  • High Quality Standards For Everyone? Not so much. What about special needs kids? How could
  • CC harm early learners?
  • Testing Testing Testing
  • Data Collection – The government wants to know everything about your children. How can you protect their privacy?
  • What are your rights according to Missouri state law? How can you begin to assert those rights?
  • What is happening at the federal level when it comes to Common Core, Data Collection and state’s rights to control education
  • The future of education in Missouri – a common sense approach based on local assertion of rights already granted by our constitution and legislature.

They will also be offering the following break out sessions for various interest groups so they can network with other grassroots activists:

School Board Members – Know your rights as a School Board member. Compare experiences and network with other board members who are trying to get their district out of the public/private system of common standards.

Grassroots Activists – For parents, taxpayers, teachers, legislators. We’ll talk about everything in our activist kit, answer questions and get you networking.

Non-Public Schools (Catholic/Private/Home Schools) – Whether or not CC is in or coming to your school, you need to know what to watch for and how to keep the quality education you are paying for or providing.

You can download their flyer here.

You can pre-register for these conferences here (note the times on Eventbrite are not accurate).  The cost is $25 per person.

Sioux Falls Core Concerns Conference

StotskyThere is another Common Core conference taking place in South Dakota.  Dr. Sandra Stotsky is heading to Sioux Falls on October 5th for the “Core Concerns Conference on Common Core.”

Here is the pertinent information:

Date: Saturday, October 5th.

Time: Registration – 8:00a, Program 9:00a – 3:00p

Location: Ramkota, (3200 W. Maple St., Sioux Falls, SD)

Cost: $22.00 which includes lunch. (see update below)

You can pre-register and purchase tickets lunch here.

You can download their flyer here.

Update: I just learned that the cost of the event is free, but if you want lunch that will cost $15.

Jindal Speaks on Common Core

Bobby Jindal

Governor Bobby Jindal (R-LA) finally made a statement on the Common Core State Standards during a recent press conference in Baton Rouge on Monday.  The Advocate reports:

Wading into a national debate, Gov. Bobby Jindal said Monday that he is concerned Louisiana public school classrooms would be saddled with a “federalized curriculum” sparked by a series of tougher standards called Common Core.

Jindal, in his most expansive comments on the issue, also said he wants state Superintendent of Education John White and the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education to answer questions raised by a state lawmaker, who said Monday he wants the state to drop the standards.

“We share those concerns,” the governor said in a prepared statement in response to a reporter’s question.

“We support rigor and high academic standards that help ensure Louisiana students are getting the best possible education,” Jindal said.

“What we do not support is a national or federalized curriculum,” the governor added. “We need Louisiana standards, not Washington, D.C., standards.”

Read the rest.

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore via Flickr (CC-By-SA 2.0)

(Video) Common Core: Dangers and Threats to American Liberty

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A friend of mine forwarded this video and I thought I would share it with you.  FreedomProject Education is the group behind this video. 

Their description:

This hour long presentation explores the new government mandated Common Core standards being implemented in public schools, private schools and homeschool curriculum. Dr. Duke Pesta (their academic director) and Mrs. Mary Black (student development director) offer an in-depth look at Common Core, its longterm impact, and why American’s should be concerned about these standards.

You can watch it below or here.

Common Core: Dangers And Threats To American Liberty And Education from FreedomProject on Vimeo.

South Dakota Q&A: South Dakota’s History for Common Core

south dakota flagI participated in a forum last week in Sioux Falls, SD.  Questions were complied for two months prior and the panelists were given the questions (summarized) a couple of days prior to the event.  Unfortunately since forum was not moderated and rules put in place regarding time limits South Dakota Education Secretary Melody Schopp and former South Dakota Education Secretary Rick Melmer were able to set the tone of the forum early.  Dr. Schopp was able to go first.  Hardly any of the questions were answered, and I know many of the attendees were frustrated.  I was as well since I only was able to touch the mike twice and was actually skipped over at one point.  You can read a recap here.

I made a commitment to those in attendance that I would do my best to answer the questions that Dr. Schopp and Dr. Melmer didn’t.  I’m going to break these up into several articles (there were a lot of questions!).  The first installment is on South Dakota’s History for the Common Core.  I’d like to preface this article with encouragement to check out the local experts – South Dakotans Against Common Core is an excellent resource.

Questions will be in bold, my answers italicized….

Who is responsible for bringing the Common Core standards into South Dakota?  The President or the Governor?

The President indirectly and the Governor directly.  Ultimately it was the decision of the South Dakota State Board of Education.  They voted to adopt the Common Core Math and ELA standards on November 29, 2010.  Governor Mike Rounds was aware of the process as it began several months prior and I assume signed the original memorandum of understanding with the Common Core State Standards Initiative and Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium.  The reason I’m fuzzy on that is because they were adopted with less than two months to go in his last term and I’m not sure when those were signed as I don’t have copies of the documents.  The process definitely started in his administration.

That said Governor Daugaard is complicit as well as he has continued to allow the implementation of the Common Core in South Dakota.

President Obama is complicit indirectly through the Race to the Top grant program (which was an executive earmark within the Stimulus package passed in 2009) which South Dakota did apply for.  The application did state that “high points” would be given if the applicant adopted a set of “college and career-ready standards” developed by a consortium consisting of a majority of states. The Common Core was the only game in town.  How much the Race to the Top funding (which South Dakota did not receive) played in adopting the Common Core in South Dakota is up for debate, but one can’t dismiss it’s role.

Since Governor Rounds is running for U.S. Senate it would certainly be worthwhile to have him explain his role in the adoption of the Common Core and his position today.

When did the South Dakota Legislature vote to accept the Common Core?  Did they pass it unanimously?

First how often do any state legislatures pass anything unanimously?  Second, they didn’t because they didn’t vote at all.  No state legislature voted to adopt the Common Core, this was entirely driven by the executive branch.

Why didn’t anyone know about these standards before they were implemented?

Primarily because the state legislature didn’t vet them and the State Department of Education was primarily focused on obtaining feedback from the education community.  Unless you were involved in crafting education policy at that time there was little opportunity for you to know about this.  It wasn’t on most of the media’s radar at the time.  So unless you read Education Week or trolled the South Dakota Department of Education’s website (which we now know is not a bad practice!) you probably wouldn’t hear about it anywhere else.  Had the State Legislature been given the chance to weigh in it could have brought more attention to the Common Core, and good state legislators should be soliciting feedback from their constituents.

State Senator Phyllis Heineman (R-Sioux Falls) made the argument that the State Legislature has never set standards.  I share here why I believe that is not a good practice.

When Governor Daugaard brought the Common Core into our state, who among you were serving in the legislature or the South Dakota Department of Education?  Did any of you have the opportunity to read through the standards?  Where the standards fully written in a final format at the time we adopted the Common Core?

Of the panelists (myself being an Iowan excluded) State Representative Jim Bolin (R-Canton) was in the South Dakota House of Representatives and serving on the House Education Committee.  State Senator Ernie Otten (R-Tea) was not elected until 2012.  State Senator Phyllis Heineman was not elected to the South Dakota State Senate until November of 2010.  She served in the State House from 1999-2008.  She was a member of the South Dakota State Board of Education during this process however.  Dr. Schopp was employed by the South Dakota Department of Education at the time even though she was not appointed as Education Secretary until 2011.  Dr. Rick Melmer served as Education Secretary until 2008 (development didn’t start until 2009). 

State Representative Bolin said he did not have an opportunity and heard very little from the Department regarding the Common Core.  State Senator Heineman at the forum said she read them.  I will assume Dr. Schopp did since she worked for the Department.  I know State Representative Otten did not at the time.  With Dr. Melmer I’m not sure if he read them before adoption.  I personally read them after the fact when this finally hit my radar – by that time 46 states had adopted them in full or in part (Minnesota only adopted the ELA standards).

Where the standards fully written? Yes the final draft of the Common Core was released in May of 2010.  South Dakota did not approve the standards until November.

Did the State Board of Education have open meetings to discuss the Common Core, looking for the opinion of others?  Where there public meetings?  Who was involved, when, and where were they held?

Yes, all state board meetings are open to the public.  The process, as Dr. Schopp described it, didn’t seem to focus on the opinion of anyone beyond classroom teachers the Department hired to review them in their draft and final forms.  I could not find minutes for these teacher Common Core workgroups.

Did the public know the importance of attending at the time?  Probably not.

Here is what I could find on the department website, I am not sure if the months I’m missing means they didn’t meet, neglected to have minutes recorded or they were in executive session.

According to the Department website the Board of Education didn’t first discuss the Common Core until the September meeting.

Here is how the official minutes described the adoption of the Common Core (November 2010)

10.0 Public Hearing – Adoption of Common Core Standards for English language arts, and math 1:03 p.m.

President Duncan asked for any Proponents to the adoption. Written comments that were submitted through e-mail were provided to board members. Becky Nelson from Dept. spoke in favor of adopting the common core and Fred Aderhold from the Sioux Falls school district shared his approval for the adoption on behalf of the Sioux Falls school district. Having no other proponents come forward Duncan asked for opponents. Steve S_____ from Mitchell came forward to express his disapproval of adopting the Common Core Standards and why. No other proponents came forward at this time and President Duncan asked for a motion.

Motion: Motion by Richard Gowen and seconded by Phyllis Heineman to approve the proposed adoption of Common Core Standards.

Conclusion: The motion carried

Real descriptive eh?  A public hearing that had only two members of the public speak?  No idea how many attended.

Two meetings… a short public forum during the second meeting and they’re adopted!  How many of the board of education members read the standards prior to voting?  Who knows?

What steps were taken to include the opinions & expertise of any local school boards, teachers, parents and/or state legislators before adopting Common Core?

Dr. Schopp said school districts were communicated with, a public forum was held, and teachers had feedback (I could not find teacher workgroup minutes, and she didn’t describe how school districts were kept informed.  They started offering a series of webinars in December 2010, but that was after the adoption of the Common Core.  You can see above what the “public forum” entailed.  Considering the board of education only had two months itself to consider the Common Core State Standards I find it very hard to believe there was a concerted effort to solicit feedback from the public.

Is it true that several educators from the state of South Dakota had the opportunity to approve of the common core standards?  Who were these educators?  When and where were the meetings held?

According to the Department yes.  I don’t know; minutes for these meetings are available (unless I’m just not using the right search terms).  I would recommend a South Dakota resident submit a Freedom of Information request (or whatever South Dakota calls it) to see if you can get that information from the Department.

According to the South Dakota Department of Education website, the South Dakota Board of Education moved to adopt the Common Core Standards on November 29, 2010.  Does this mean the Legislature had no knowledge and no debate about the Common Core?

I can’t speak authoritatively about how many legislators knew, how much they knew or when, but I can say the State Legislature did not debate or vote on these standards.

Next in this series will be answers on Data Mining & Sharing & Federal Involvement.

Scott Walker on the Common Core: We Can Do It Better

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Some encouraging words from Governor Scott Walker (R-WI) as reported by Ryan Ekvall of Wisconsin Reporter:

Walker thinks the state can replace those national standards with its own set of stronger standards.

“I’d like the Legislature to hold those hearings,” Walker said in a response to Wisconsin Reporter’s question on Common Core. “And in the larger context I’d like us to be in the position where we can identify our own unique standards that I think in many ways will be higher and more aggressive than the ones they’re talking about.”

See the video below: